Resources

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Can the work be performed on weekends or holidays in order to cause the least amount of disruption for my business?
    All of our work can be performed on weekends and holidays. We try to accommodate our customers in any way possible
  • Can you provide me with a list of playgrounds games you can paint?
    Yes- we have a list we can mail, email or fax to you. If you have an idea for a new game lets talk about it – we can probably make it happen
  • Can you create custom games for our playground?
    Of course – if you come up with an idea we will try to figure out a way to make it happen
  • Can my work be done in multiple phases in order to cause the least amount of disruption?
    Yes! Our goal is to keep the disruption to a minimum. We will do the job in as many phases as necessary to keep the facility in operation
  • How long before I can walk on new sealcoat or slurry seal?
    Typically, you can walk on sealcoat and slurry seal the same day it is placed. Shady areas will take longer to dry and should be avoided for 24 hours. Sealcoat is shiny when wet and flat black when dry. Remember to keep your pets off of fresh seal and slurry too.
  • How long before I can drive on new sealcoat or slurry seal?
    Typically, you can walk on new sealcoat and slurry seal the day after it is applied. Most often we open lots up to traffic at 8 am the day following application
  • Would a representative from your company be willing to meet with our board to discuss our maintenance needs?
    We are always eager and willing to help your association in any way possible. If our attending a board meeting would be helpful – count us in!
  • How much does it cost to get an estimate?
    Estimates are 100% free! When you call in our office we will take down some basic job info. An estimator will receive your request, arrange a site visit and prepare a price. We can mail, fax or email your price to you. All of this is free! It is important to know that our estimators are consultants and do not receive a commission on work. They will make recommendations on what your pavement needs, bottom line.
  • What is the difference between sealcoat and rock slurry seal?
    Sealcoat is an application of asphalt emulsion, minerals and sand. It is ideal for pavement that is in relatively good shape. Slurry seal is a combination of aggregate, asphalt emulsion and fillers. It goes down very thick and is ideal for older, more damaged asphalt.
  • How do you ensure that all tenants/residents are aware of work schedule days?
    Depending upon the job, we either post notices door to door or put work details on barricades placed throughout the property
  • How can I tell if the sealcoat is dry enough to walk on?
    Sealcoat is shiny when wet and flat black when dry
  • Can you provide me with proof of your liability and workers compensation insurance?
    Definitely! We can provide you with proof of our insurance as well as name your company as additional insured.
  • What is your standard warranty for the work that you do?
    Under California law, our work is guaranteed for one year.
  • How will you keep the work area safe from pedestrians and vehicles?
    We use a combination of barricades, delineators, string line and signage to ensure the area is blocked off safely for both our crews and pedestrians/passengers.
  • How long does it take the striping paint to dry?
    Typically it takes 10 minutes for the paint to dry
  • How early in the morning does your crew start?
    We usually start at 6:45, but will start as early as necessary to complete the work and cause least disruption. We can even work at night if absolutely necessary
  • Why should I have my pavement sealed?
    Sealcoat acts as a barrier between your pavement and the detrimental effects of the enviornment and chemicals. A layer of sealer also acts as a waterproofing agent, minimizing the amount of water that can enter the pavement and cause damage. Sealcoating your asphalt is one of the most important and cost effective pavement maintenance options.
  • How often should pavement be sealed?
    Depending upon the use of the pavement, it should be sealed every 3 – 5 years
  • Will sealcoat seal the cracks in the pavement?
    No, the sealer will help to fill in smaller cracks, but most visible cracks will need to be filled and sealed with crack sealer

What you should know before hiring a contractor

Project Checklist:

  • Check the contractors license number at www.cslb.ca.gov to make sure it is current
  • Get at least three bids from three different contractors.
  • Get three references from each bidder and review past work
  • Ask if the contractor carries the appropriate insurance coverage, including general liability and workers compensation. Ask for proof of coverage
  • Make sure the work expectations are clearly written on the proposal, including clean-up and debris removal. Ask the contractor if they understand exactly what you want
  • Never pay in cash
  • Keep all project documents including proposal, invoices, payments etc in one file
  • Try researching the contractor online for reviews – but always consider the source

General Advice:

  • Only hire licensed contractors, and make sure they have the correct type of license
  • Any contractor performing $500 or more worth of work must be licensed
  • Don't rush into repairs, take time to think it over
  • Don’t hire the first contractor that comes along or get caught up in high pressure sales
  • Don’t make the final payment until you are completely satisfied with the job

Beware of Asphalt Paving Scams

As asphalt pavement ages, it begins to fade and look worn out. Its human nature that property owners will want to get the asphalt rejuvenated as inexpensively as possible. When you begin to think about upcoming repair projects, be cautious of paving scam operators.

A traveling asphalt crew may approach you by going door-to-door and offering to pave or seal your asphalt for a bargain with materials left over from a job. Reputable contractors will never peddle asphalt or sealer door-to door. Also, asphalt is never leftover. Leftover asphalt would be to cold to place properly. These traveling scams usually result in you being swindled out of money and given an inferior product and the scammer has already moved on to a new city or state. In many cases the work is started and never finished or is of such poor quality that it has to be removed by a reputable contractor at the property owners expense.

If you suspect one of these traveling scammers is in your neighborhood, write down the license number and call your local police department immediately. This activity should also be reported to the California Contractors State License Board at (916) 255-2924. Help protect your neighbors by not allowing these scammers to get another victim.

Red Flags:

  • Often solicit door-to-door
  • Come across as being friendly but use high pressure tactics
  • Wont give a price up front or provide a written contract
  • Demand to be paid in cash
  • Immediately cash the checks you pay them with
  • Drive newer vehicles with out of license plates
  • Use toll free numbers instead of local numbers
  • Have Post office box numbers instead of street addresses
  • Target the elderly
  • Offer complimentary inspections and then offer to fix the problems they find
  • One Time Offer Quotes – a reputable contractor will always give you a written quote so you have time to shop around and compare pricing
  • Too good to be true price – if the quoted price seems low, the quality of the work will likely be low also

Glossary

  • ADA: Americans with Disabilities Act – Federal, State and Local laws which mandate requirements that must be met to assist those with disabilities
  • Aggregate: Stones, gravel or sand mixed with asphalt cement to create asphalt concrete
  • Alligator Cracks: Visible signs of failing asphalt that consist of interconnected cracks that look similar to alligator skin
  • Asphalt Based Sealcoat (Sealcoat, Overkote): Mixture of asphalt emulsion and sand placed on asphalt pavement surface to help preserve, weatherproof and rejuvenate
  • Asphalt Concrete: Asphalt cement and aggregate mixed together, placed and compacted. Commonly used for road surfaces and parking lots
  • Asphalt: Sticky black liquid present in crude petroleum. Mixed with aggregate to create asphalt concrete
  • Backfill: Material used to re-fill areas where pavement has been removed
  • Base Rock: Graded aggregate that creates a structure to hold up traffic
  • Batch Plant (Hot Plant): Manufacturing facility that mixes asphalt cement with hot aggregate to be used for paving
  • Cape Seal: A road resurfacing method that requires the combination of two separate sealing methods. First, a chip seal layer is applied and cured. Second, a layer of slurry seal over the top of the chip seal.
  • Catch Basin (Drop Inlet): A receptacle designed to collect water prior to entering a sewer
  • Chip Seal: A resurfacing method for medium traffic roadways where a layer of hot liquid asphalt is first sprayed on the pavement surface and then a layer of crushed aggregate is placed and smoothed out so it is flat
  • Compaction: To pack asphalt and other materials downward or closely together in order to make more dense, solid and stable
  • Cracksealer (Cold): An emulsified rubberized product that is designed to fill and seal small cracks
  • Cracksealer (Hot): Hot rubberized product that is designed to fill and seal small to larger cracks
  • Digout (Pavement Repair): Act of removing and replacing an area of pavement that has failed
  • Drain Rock: Course aggregate designed to facilitate the movement of water to a drain
  • Drop Inlet: Collects water from surface drainage system
  • Emulsified Asphalt: Mixture of asphalt cement, water and an emulsifying agent
  • Emulsion: Two or more products milled together to create a stable material
  • Flow Line: The low point of drainage gutter, pipe or swale to which water flows
  • Fog Seal: Emulsified asphalt, sprayed on an asphalt surface for a temporary seal
  • French Drain: Small trench filled with drain rock or gravel that uses gravity to redirect surface water and groundwater
  • Gatorpave: Modified asphalt emulsion and fibers designed to fill and seal "alligatored" and cracked asphalt pavement areas
  • Geotextile: Manufactured synthetic fabric used to deflect water and reduce reflective cracking on overlayed pavement
  • Hot Plant (Batch Plant) : Manufacturing facility that mixes asphalt cement with hot aggregate to be used for paving
  • Leveling Course: Thin layer of asphalt used to reduce irregularities in the existing pavement prior to the placement of subsequent layers
  • Longitudinal Cracks: Cracks in the pavement that are long and straight. They are commonly parallel to each other
  • Move – In (Phase): The number of times we will need to move our crews in and out of the property in order to complete project and ensure the facility can continue to operate
  • Oil Spot: Oil that has leaked from vehicles onto the pavement. Oil spots are displeasing to the eye and destroy the integrity of the pavement
  • Overkote (Asphalt Based Sealcoat, Sealcoat): Mixture of asphalt emulsion, minerals and sand placed on asphalt pavement surface to help preserve, weatherproof and rejuvenate
  • Overlay (Resurfacing): Layer of asphalt concrete placed over existing asphalt paving. Restores quality of pavement, increases structural strength and extends service life
  • Oxidize: Decomposition of asphalt products caused by exposure to the elements. New asphalt will eventually turn grey as a result of oxidation
  • Pavement Defect: Any less than desirable pavement condition
  • Pavement Repair (Digout): Act of removing an area of failed asphalt, compacting the base and then placing asphalt concrete to fill.
  • Pavement: Hard smooth surface that will support the load of vehicles, bicycles, forklifts, wheelchairs and pedestrians as designed
  • Paving Fabric: Non-woven fabric that is placed on existing asphalt prior to an overlay. Helps to prevent surface water intrusion and helps to prevent cracks from reflecting through overlay
  • Permeability: Rate at which water can flow or pass through soil or asphalt concrete
  • Phase (Move- In): The number of times we will need to move our crews in and out of the property in order to complete project and ensure the facility can continue to operate
  • Power Steering Tear: The lateral turning of the tire without rolling, creates tears in new sealcoat and slurry seal
  • Power Sweeper (Power Broom): Power operated rotary broom used to clean loose material off pavement
  • Raveling: Act of losing aggregate as the asphalt cement decomposes
  • Reflective Cracks: Cracks in asphalt overlay that reflect the previous cracks in the base layer beneath
  • Resurfacing (Overlay): Layer of asphalt concrete placed over existing asphalt paving. Restores quality of pavement, increases structural strength and extends service life
  • Rock Slurry Seal (Slurry Seal): Combination of aggregate, asphalt emulsion and fillers. When applied it fills voids and extends pavement life. Ideal for older pavements when an overlay is cost prohibitive. Tough, long lasting surface treatment
  • Roller: Steel drum roller that is driven over new, hot asphalt cement to help with compaction
  • Rutting: Depressions in the wheel paths caused by unstable pavement or inadequate underlying base
  • Sand: Very fine particles from rock
  • Seal coat (Asphalt Based Sealcoat, OverKote): Mixture of asphalt emulsion, minerals and sand placed on asphalt pavement surface to help preserve, weatherproof and rejuvenate
  • Skid Resistance: Ability of a paved surface to offer resistance to skidding or slipping
  • Skin Patch: Thin layer of asphalt cement spread over a depression of the surface as a temporary treatment
  • Slope: Inclination or slant, difference in vertical elevation of two points divided by horizontal distance between
  • Slurry Seal (Rock Slurry Seal): Combination of aggregate, asphalt emulsion and fillers. When applied it fills voids and extends pavement life. Ideal for older pavements when an overlay is cost prohibitive. Tough, long lasting surface treatment
  • Squeegee: Rubber edged tool used to move material
  • Storm Drain: Pipelines used to carry rainfall that has drained from paved surfaces to the drainage course
  • Subgrade: Prepared earth surface on which a base layer or pavement is placed
  • Tack Coat: Liquid asphalt emulsion applied to existing surfaces to promote bonding of old asphalt to new asphalt
  • Trip / Fall Hazard: Unexpected obstruction or depression that can cause a pedestrian to stumble or fall
  • Truncated Domes: System of textured ground surface indicators used to assist blind and vision impaired pedestrians, typically yellow in color
  • Weathering: Gradual breaking down or decomposition of asphalt cement due to hardening and oxidation

Pavement markings and signage are always one of those eleventh hour items needed to turn a project over to our clients. Stripe 'N' Seal is a company that we can always count on for timely scheduling, accurate layouts, professional service and fair pricing. They are prompt with their administrative correspondence and field personnel always have a strong knowledge of code and ADA requirements. Stripe 'N' Seal & Aaron Paving help make a project easier when things are down to the wire."

-Michael Quesenbury, CSI, CDT, LEED AP
Estimator/Project Manager, Jim Murphy & Associates

I like doing business with Stripe 'N’ Seal for any number of reasons. They are prompt to come out and look at potential jobs and advise on how they can best be done. Their prices are always very competitive and fair. Their finished product is always excellent and requires no returns and fixes. Their entire staff is friendly and helpful. It is a pleasure doing business with Stripe 'N' Seal. I definitely recommend Stripe 'N' Seal to my staff and to any others and will certainly call them for future work."

-Edison Lewis CPM
Certified Property Manager, Keegin & Coppin Co., Inc.

I have contracted with a variety of paving companies, however, over the past 5-years, I’ve kept to Stripe 'N’ Seal. I remain 100% satisfied with their work."

-Erinne Mickle
Property Manager, Basin Street Properties

Stripe 'N' Seal has been a great company to do business with. They have always been very prompt to come out and look at what we need done no matter how big or small the job is."

-Daniel Hebel
Maintenance & Operations Supervisor, Rincon Valley Union School District

I very much appreciate that Stripe 'N' Seal took the time to meet with me, provide a proposal and ultimately mobilize so quickly on our paving and striping project. My client was really happy that we took care of their problem in such short order- and it looks great!"

-Larry D. Townsend
Estimator/ Project manager, C.L.Y. Inc., dba Sonoma-Marin Construction

Your company is unique because your quality of work is always consistent. It is easy for us to do business with you because your price is always competitive."

-Mai Love
Business Coordinator, Codding Construction

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